MOVE OVER LAW QUIZ

  1. Under Arizona's Move Over law, drivers must move over or slow down when passing by a minivan with flashing lights that's pulled to the side of the road.

    True False

    TRUE! Whether it's a minivan, motorcycle or any other private vehicle, emergency responder, tow truck or taxi — Arizona's Move Over law protects ALL vehicles with flashing lights that are pulled over.

  2. Under Arizona's Move Over law, it does not matter what color or type of flashing lights a vehicle has.

    True False

    TRUE! When referring to a vehicle's flashing lights, they can be red, blue, strobe, white, amber or any color. They can be atop an emergency vehicle or the hazard lights on your own vehicle. The law applies to any and all flashing lights on any type of vehicle that is pulled over.

  3. When approaching a vehicle with flashing lights that is pulled to the side, it is OK to slow down and use caution if moving over is not safe or possible.

    True False

    TRUE! The law recognizes that moving over one lane to create a safe margin of space is not always possible or safe because of traffic conditions or because a second lane does not exist. In such cases, drivers should slow down to 20 mph below the posted speed limit and use caution. Drivers should watch for people or objects in or near the travel lane.

  4. Failing to comply with Arizona's Move Over law can result in a citation and fine of $150 or more.

    True False

    TRUE! In addition to being cited, the driver can be fined. The base fine is $150, but depending on the jurisdiction where the violation occurs, additional fees can be added and increase the amount to $650.

  5. The most important reason to comply with Arizona's Move Over law is to protect your own life and the lives of others.

    True False

    TRUE! Arizona's Move Over law aims to protect everyone who uses or works on or next to our streets, roads and highways. Tragically, hundreds of people are injured and killed every year from coast-to-coast in crashes involving a driver who strikes an occupied vehicle that is pulled over, people next to the vehicle or both. Nationally, these types of crashes kill an average of one tow truck driver every six days, 23 highway workers and one law-enforcement official every month, and five firefighters every year.